Heroes, Legends, and the Rest of Us 

April 23, 2016

  
An interesting thing about musicians dying, for me anyway, is how it takes me back to a time in my life that I might never have thought about again were it not for the artist’s passing. I hope that doesn’t sound selfish, as I’m not trying to make it about me, but music is a very personal thing. I think most artists would be happy to have a legacy of creating unique memories and emotions for their fans.

I first heard Prince in ’84 or ’85 on my best friend Chris Eason’s boombox (meaning no harm and knowing no better, we called it a ghetto blaster), which he brought on the school bus most days. “When Doves Cry” was played over and over again for months, driving many of us crazy. I hated the song originally but, over the course of the school year, grew to like it quite a bit. In part because my buddy did, and in part perhaps because my subconscious convinced me that I might as well accept it. Three decades later, as a musician and music lover, I can truly appreciate the genius of Prince’s work, although I admit I was never a huge fan of his entire catalog, and haven’t really listened to him in a long time. Oddly, I still keep in touch with some of the people who were on that bus — people who were never really close friends — yet I haven’t talked to my pal Chris in well over 20 years. I wonder if Prince’s death made him think about those days on the bus so long ago. I hope so — or maybe it conjured up a different memory. Hopefully a good one.

Sadly, we are on the cusp of losing many of our beloved musicians. Prince went too early, but their are many brilliant, aging artists like Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Mick Jagger, and Joni Mitchell, just to name a few, who are in the twilight of their careers and lives. They have created memories for multiple generations, and continue to do so today. When the time comes, I will remember them for their contributions to my life. How their music impacted me personally. How it got me through rough times, and also how it made good times better.

When we are young, many of us consider our favorite musicians to be immortal heroes. As we get older, we realize that musicians are very human. Maybe they are more talented and creative in some ways, but they have problems, the suffer, they hurt, and they die — just like the rest of us. The wonderful thing is that they leave something behind for us to enjoy, to remember them by, and to continue being a part of our personal soundtrack of life. 

There is an old saying that heroes get remembered, but legends never die. The truth is, though, that we are all just gathered here today to get through this thing called life, and that’s not always easy. May the heroes, the legends, and all the rest of us continue to rock on as long as possible. 

Cheers.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: